Patrick Sandoval getting workload limited by Angels


Save 20% on CBD Products with "Save20"

OAKLAND — Lefty Patrick Sandoval was solid for a second straight start but it was a shortened one, as the Angels are looking to limit the rookie’s innings down the stretch.
Sandoval allowed one run over 3 1/3 innings in a 4-0 loss to the A’s on Wednesday, giving up

OAKLAND — Lefty Patrick Sandoval was solid for a second straight start but it was a shortened one, as the Angels are looking to limit the rookie’s innings down the stretch.

Sandoval allowed one run over 3 1/3 innings in a 4-0 loss to the A’s on Wednesday, giving up exactly one hit for a second straight outing. The 22-year-old was coming off the best start of his career, giving up one hit over five scoreless frames against the Rangers on Aug. 28.

“He’s going to be on a restricted pitch limit the rest of the way because we don’t want his payload to increase too much over what he threw last year,” Angels manager Brad Ausmus said. “The explanation [from the front office] was it’s better to have him to continue to do work through the length of the season, rather than have him do a lot and then shut him down before the end of the season. It keeps him on a regular work schedule but a lower work payload.”

Box score

Sandoval was aware before the start that he had roughly 50-60 pitches to work with, and he knows that’ll be the norm going forward.

“It’s not that big of a deal,” Sandoval said. “You just go out there and compete as long as you can until he tells me I’m done. I know it’s for my own good. It’s to keep me healthy. I’m on board.”

Sandoval now has a 4.91 ERA in 25 2/3 innings in the Majors this year. Combined with his 80 1/3 innings thrown between Double-A Mobile and Triple-A Salt Lake this season, Sandoval has pitched 106 frames.

Last year, he threw 122 1/3 innings across three levels and the Angels don’t want to see him get much higher than that threshold. Sandoval is currently lined up for four more starts this season and they’ll be shortened much like Wednesday’s outing, as expanded rosters make it more feasible for the bullpen to absorb those innings. It’s the first time he’s pitching into September since he was taken by the Astros in the 11th round of the 2015 Draft.

“It’s an extra month,” Sandoval said. “So I definitely understand what they’re trying to do. It’s not a bad thing. But I felt great. Body feels great. Mind feels great. Nothing going on.”

Sandoval was taken out after having thrown 52 pitches, with 30 going for strikes. He registered seven swings and misses, including four with his changeup, which was again his best pitch. He struck out three, including Matt Chapman to end the third.

“He was a little wild early but he did a nice job,” Ausmus said. “I thought he used his breaking balls very well today. He used his curveball well, and his changeup is always good when he’s in the area with it.”

The lone hit surrendered by Sandoval was a homer, as he gave up a solo shot to Jurickson Profar in the second on a 1-0 fastball on the outside part of the plate. Sandoval also walked one, issuing a free pass to Chapman in the first.

“I felt good,” Sandoval said. “I felt like I executed a lot better. Profar just beat me on a fastball. Nothing I can do about that.”

Sandoval made a move to the middle of the rubber during his last start, as he previously pitched from the extreme third-base side of the rubber. The move seems to be working, as he’s allowed one run on two hits over his last 8 1/3 innings.

“It’s a huge help,” Sandoval said.

So while Ausmus said he’s pleased to see Sandoval faring better recently, it’s clear they’re more concerned with Sandoval’s future than the present.

“It’s not the best way to evaluate him, but let’s be honest, we want to keep him healthy more than evaluate him,” Ausmus said. “We’ll have more time to evaluate him.”

Rhett Bollinger covers the Angels for MLB.com. He previously covered the Twins from 2011-18. Follow him on Twitter @RhettBollinger and Facebook.



Related posts

Leave a Comment